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WHY INVEST IN A MOVIE?
A movie is the best investment one can make for the up-side potential vs. the risk. They're better than real estate, blue chip stocks, gold, silver, precious stones, income-producing rental properties, futures, treasuries, and international currencies . . . better than anything, with the possible exception of investing in your own education and spiritual enlightenment.

There simply is no business with manufacturing capital entry requirements as low as motion pictures where the potential return can be as unlimited over the short, medium and long terms. With the many different revenue streams associated with a movie, such as Theater Box Office, DVD Sales and Rentals, Pay Per View, Cable Release, Network Premier, and Merchandising. . . it is one of the safest and surest investments one could make today.


 
 


FILM BUDGET GROSS (Domestic / Foreign) RENTALS
"21" $35,000,000 $81,159,365 / $76,767,975 $29,746,741
"CASINO" $52,000,000 $42,438,300 / 42,512,375 $20,287,700
"MAVERICK" $40,000,000 $101,631,272 / $81,400,000 $49,500,000
"ROUNDERS" $12,000,000 $22,905,674 /  
"SMOKIN' ACES" $17,000,000 $35,787,686 / $21,316,209 $33,380,000
"THE STING" $5,500,000 $156,000,000 /  
"THE COOLER" $4,000,000 $8,243,880 / $2,000,000 $12,000,000
"THE COLOR OF MONEY" $10,000,000 $52,293,982 /  
"THE USUAL SUSPECTS" $6,000,000 $23,341,568 / $33,000,000



WHAT THE MEDIA IS SAYING ABOUT INVESTING IN INDEPENDENT FILMS AND STUDIOS

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By Michael Brush

As I had forecast last year, recession-weary Americans are filling darkened theaters to hide from the gloom and doom, just as they did during the 1930s. That's made the film industry a rare bright spot in this economy.

The industry's total box office was up 1.5% last year despite the economy's slowdown, and people started heading to the theaters in droves this year as things turned really bad:

Though retail spending fell 10% in the first quarter of 2009 compared with a year earlier, consumers shelled out 10% more to see movies in theaters.

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NEW YORK - True to form and in keeping with past recessions, Americans are flocking to the movies, the chief executive of the largest U.S. theater chain said Regal Entertainment Group's CEO Mike Campbell told Reuters.

The movie industry has done well during all the recessions in the past 50 years. "It is still the most affordable out of home entertainment option," he said.

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By Bruce Shutan

Independent Film Growth Offers Lucrative
Opportunities Laced With Glitz And Glamour

Notwithstanding all the tantalizing exposure to glitz and glamour, the number tell a more sobering story that will pique the interest of every indie film buff. There's excellent potential for enormous returns on a smart film investment in a growing business.

Motion pictures that were once made largely under the radar have catapulted the walk-and-talk genre to new heights since Hollywood has embraced more corporate business practices. Consider, for instance, that nearly 40% of studio releases are acquired from independent producers, while 18% of U.S. domestic box office releases are fed by independent distributors.

With prudence serving as their guide, Hollywood's new money managers have brought organization and sophistication to the indie market's exciting world of make believe.

Bruce Shutan is an L.A. based freelance writer who has written about financial planning and employee benefits issues since 1988, as well as show business since 2000.

 

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By Michael Cieply and Brooks Barnes

While much of the economy is teetering between bust and bailout, the movie industry has been startled by a box-office surge that has little precedent in the modern era. Suddenly it seems as if everyone is going to the movies, with ticket sales this year up 17.5 percent, to $1.7 billion, according to Media by Numbers, a box-office tracking company.

And it is not just because ticket prices are higher. Attendance has also jumped, by nearly 16 percent. If that pace continues through the year, it would amount to the biggest box-office surge in at least two decades.

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By John D. Sutter

Observers say struggling people are looking for a $10, two-hour escape."The movies offer a way to go not only outside of your house, but to a whole different world -- and that's very appealing right now," said Paul Dergarabedian, a box office analyst at Hollywood.com.

Audiences are going along for that ride in record numbers. Gross movie ticket sales to this weekend were up 18.8 percent over the same period last year, to $1.66 billion, according to BoxOfficeMojo.com. Box offices saw their best January in history this year, with more than $1 billion in gross sales.

Jeremy Kay, a blogger for the UK newspaper The Guardian, used that news to predict that this will be the biggest year for ticket earnings in the history of Hollywood.

"If you look at what's coming up over the next 10 months it seems reasonable to assume this year will be the biggest we've seen," he wrote on the site's film blog.

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